Top 5 Fastest Ways to Launch Command Prompt in Windows 10

The command prompt in Windows 10 lets you do a lot of administrative tasks with ease. Just type commands at the command prompt and then you can perform your tasks on your PC without using the Windows graphical interface.Following are 5 fast ways that can help you open the command prompt in Windows 10. Let's check out now!1. Launch the command prompt in Windows 10 from RunA quick way for you to open the command prompt in Windows 10 is opening it from Run. To do this, you open RUN dialog box by pressing the “Win + R” key. Then you type cmd and tap on OK. That’s it.You can open the command prompt in Windows 10 quickly from Run.2. Launch the command prompt in Windows 10 from CortanaIf you have a microphone installed on your device, just tell Microsoft's personal assistant app Cortana to open the the command prompt for you. To do this, you simply click on the microphone icon and tell her to "Launch Command Prompt". It will immediately launch the Command Prompt window for you.You can tell Cortana to "Launch Command Prompt” as it can understand what you want to do and will launch the Command Prompt window for you in just a moment. If you don’t have an installed microphone, you can type command or cmd. Next, you click on the Command Prompt result.3. Launch the command prompt from All Apps in Start MenuOpening the command prompt from All Apps in Start Menu is another highly recommended way. To do this, you launch the Start menu, click on All apps, scroll down and expand the Windows System folder. Finally, just click on Command Prompt.4. Launch the command prompt from File ExplorerUsing File Explorer is another fast way that can open the command prompt in Windows 10. To do this, you open File Explorer and navigate to the C:WindowsSystem32 folder. Then you simply click on cmd.exe and choose Open.5. Launch the command prompt from Explorer Address BarTo open the command prompt from Explorer Address Bar, you launch File Explorer and click on its address bar. Then you simply type cmd in the address bar and that’s it.Above are 5 ways that can help you open the command prompt in Windows 10 quickly and easily. If you have any problems, please feel free to leave your comments below.

Windows 10: How to Change the Default PDF Reader

Microsoft Edge is a great feature that tech giant Microsoft’s new operating system Windows 10 brings its users all over the world. It is the default browser and the default PDF reader in the final version of Windows 10 as well. It means that you don;t have to install a third-party app or any reader to view PDF files.However, if you don’t like Edge and prefer a feature-rich application as the default PDF reader, following are two methods that can help you change the default PDF Reader in Windows 10. Let’s check out now!Method 1: Use Open With in File ExplorerStep 1: Go to File Explorer and navigate to a folder that contains any PDF file. Right-click on a PDF file and choose Open with from the context menu that appears.Step 2: Click Choose another app to open to open How do you want to open this file?You can use Open With in File Explorer to change the default PDF Reader in Windows 10 easily.Step 3: You can choose one from the listed apps or click More apps, choose an app or scroll down to see Look for another app in this PC link. Click this link to browse the program that you want to set as the default PDF reader.Note: You should check the box labelled Always use this app to open .pdf files before selecting a program.Step 4: Select the program and press Open button to set it as the default PDF reader in Windows 10.Method 2: Use Default Programs in Control PanelStep 1: Open Control Panel, change View by to Small icons and choose Default Programs. Or you can type default programs in the Start menu search box and hit Enter to open the desktop version of Default Programs.Step 2: Scroll down the list and click on .PDF entryStep 3: Press the Change program button to open How do you want to open this file?Another way to change the default PDF Reader in Windows 10 is using Default Programs in Control Panel.Step 4: You can choose one from the listed apps or click More apps, choose an app or scroll down to see Look for another app in this PC link. Click this link to browse the program that you want to set as the default PDF reader.Step 5: Select the program and press Open button to set it as the default PDF reader in Windows 10.That’s it!

How to monitor Nginx with Munin

Munin is one of the most powerful monitoring systems for dedicated servers and cloud enviroments. It allows you to monitor your server and network activity by providing useful graphics of your CPU, Memory, Disks, Network Devices and also running system services.
Nginx on the other side, is the most popular Web server, used by millions of busy websites to boost their speed, scalability and server performance. But Nginx needs to be monitored in order to know what’s going on and how it’s working, handling requests and using resources.
How can I monitor Nginx with Munin monitoring system?
We will assume you have a fully working Nginx web server, if not check out this guides:
Installing Nginx on CentOS 7
How to install Nginx on Ubuntu
How to install Nginx from source
Installing Munin on CentOS
Let’s install Munin with yum
yum install munin munin-node -y
If you can’t find/install any munin* packages, check out this guide about installing EPEL repo, that may be needed in case the default CentOS repo doesn’t include Munin. Add munin-node to start automatically after boot
chkconfig munin-node on
Configure Munin
nano -w /etc/httpd/conf.d/munin.conf
Comment this lines by placing a # in front of them:
#AuthUserFile /etc/munin/munin-htpasswd
#AuthName "Munin"
#AuthType Basic
#require valid-user

Restart Munin:
service munin-node restart

Configuring Munin on Nginx
It’s simple, just add this location block into your virtual host configuration:
# munin configuration
location /munin {
alias /var/www/html/munin/;
allow 127.0.0.1;
allow XX.XX.XX.XX;
deny all;
index index.php index.html index.htm;
location ~* .(png|jpg|jpeg|gif|ico)$ {
}
}

Make sure you replace “XX.XX.XX.XX” with your real public IP, in case you have a static IP address for your internet connection, if you don’t just remove the allow/deny block.
You must also configure Nginx status so Munin can monitor it properly, you can enable it at the same file edited before by adding:
# nginx_status configuration, need for Munin
location /nginx_status {
stub_status on;
access_log off;
allow 127.0.0.1;
deny all;
}

Fully example of a working Munin configuration inside Nginx:
server {
listen 80 default_server;
access_log off;
server_name _;
server_name_in_redirect off;
root /var/www/html;

# munin configuration
location /munin {
alias /var/www/html/munin/;
allow 127.0.0.1;
allow XX.XX.XX.XX;
deny all;
index index.php index.html index.htm;
location ~* .(png|jpg|jpeg|gif|ico)$ {
}
}

# nginx_status configuration, need for Munin
location /nginx_status {
stub_status on;
access_log off;
allow 127.0.0.1;
deny all;
}
}

This configuration can be placed inside conf.d directory, for example: /etc/nginx/conf.d/server.conf or /etc/nginx/conf.d/munin.conf. Finally, reload Nginx to apply changes:
service nginx reload
After that, you should be able to watch Munin graphs from http://YOUR.SERVER.IP/munin/Don’t get surprised if you don’t see any Nginx graph, we have to make sure the plugins are installed.
Nginx monitoring plugins for Munin
In order to have Munin generating graphs for Nginx, you must make sure this plugins exist in your Munin plugin directory:
ls -alh /etc/munin/plugins/nginx_request /etc/munin/plugins/nginx_status

If those doesn’t exist, simply add them to the Munin plugins directory by creating this two symbolic links:
ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/nginx_request /etc/munin/plugins/ -v
ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/nginx_status /etc/munin/plugins/ -v
Installing additional Nginx plugins for Munin
There are two additional 3rd party unofficial Nginx plugins that are going to be need: RAM monitoring and requests monitoring. Use the following commands to get it installed into your CentOS Munin installation:
wget https://github.com/perusio/nginx-munin/archive/master.zip
unzip master.zip
cd nginx-munin-master/
cp nginx_connection_request nginx_memory /etc/munin/plugins/ -fv

Restart munin to apply changes:
service munin-node restart

At this time, you should have 4 Nginx plugins working with Munin:
nginx_status: shows a graphic for Nginx server status configuration.
nginx_request: shows you the total requests of your Nginx web server.
nginx_connection_request: presents the number of requests served by connection handled by nginx.
nginx_memory: this plugins will let you know the memory used by Nginx processes, it’s calculated using ps and awk commands.
How can I check if this plugins are working?
Simple, browse http://YOUR.SERVER.IP/munin/ and you should see a section called “Nginx”, there you will find the graphs. If graphs are empty wait 10 minutes and check again.
Conclusion
As we’ve seen, having a monitoring system is really important and a critical part of your server management plan. By using Munin to monitor Nginx activity, you will be able to know more detailes about Nginx requests, memory usage & the Nginx general status. This will bring you the possibility to find problems quicky or avoid them by knowing how your Nginx is working. If you followed this guide step by step right from the top, at this time you should know how to monitor Nginx without any issues.
Further reading:
Munin official website
The post How to monitor Nginx with Munin appeared first on ScaleScale.com.

How to compile ngx_pagespeed into Nginx on CentOS 7

ngx_pagespeed is an Nginx module that allows you to automatically optimize the resources of your web pages, it can setup a bunch of really cool cache rules to reduce the bandwidth used across the network, minify & combine elements to reduce the size of the files, optimize images, photos and much more to make your websites blazing fast.
How can I add mod_pagespeed into Nginx on CentOS 7?
If you compiled and installed Nginx from source, then it’s your lucky day because you will have to configure and build Nginx again, it will be really easy. And if you installed Nginx from a binary package like RPM, then you will have to remove it and install from source, but don’t worry, we will guide you during the entire process, it’s easy if you do it carefully.
Requirements
Let’s install some package requirements before we begin.
yum install gcc-c++ pcre-devel zlib-devel make unzip

Get your current Nginx configuration by typing:
nginx -V
This will provide you the current configuration of your Nginx server. The most important options are after “configure arguments:”.
Example:
[root@scalescale.com:~]nginx -V
nginx version: nginx/1.8.0
built by gcc 4.4.7 20120313 (Red Hat 4.4.7-16) (GCC)
built with OpenSSL 1.0.1e-fips 11 Feb 2013
TLS SNI support enabled
configure arguments: –prefix=/etc/nginx –sbin-path=/usr/sbin/nginx –conf-path=/etc/nginx/nginx.conf –error-log-path=/var/log/nginx/error.log –http-log-path=/var/log/nginx/access.log –pid-path=/var/run/nginx.pid –lock-path=/var/run/nginx.lock –http-client-body-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/client_temp –http-proxy-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/proxy_temp –http-fastcgi-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/fastcgi_temp –http-uwsgi-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/uwsgi_temp –http-scgi-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/scgi_temp –user=nginx –group=nginx –with-http_ssl_module –with-http_realip_module –with-http_addition_module –with-http_sub_module –with-http_dav_module –with-http_flv_module –with-http_mp4_module –with-http_gunzip_module –with-http_gzip_static_module –with-http_random_index_module –with-http_secure_link_module –with-http_stub_status_module –with-http_auth_request_module –with-mail –with-mail_ssl_module –with-file-aio –with-ipv6 –with-http_spdy_module –with-cc-opt='-O2 -g -pipe -Wp,-D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 -fexceptions -fstack-protector –param=ssp-buffer-size=4 -m64 -mtune=generic'

Create a backup of your init.d script
cp /etc/init.d/nginx /etc/init.d/nginx.bak

Create a backup of your Nginx configuration files
rsync -avpr /etc/nginx /etc/nginx.bak –exclude="logs"

Download ngx_pagespeed module
cd
NPS_VERSION=1.9.32.10
wget https://github.com/pagespeed/ngx_pagespeed/archive/release-${NPS_VERSION}-beta.zip
unzip release-${NPS_VERSION}-beta.zip
cd ngx_pagespeed-release-${NPS_VERSION}-beta/
wget https://dl.google.com/dl/page-speed/psol/${NPS_VERSION}.tar.gz
tar -xzvf ${NPS_VERSION}.tar.gz # extracts to psol/
Download and build Nginx with support for PageSpeed
cd
# check http://nginx.org/en/download.html for the latest version
NGINX_VERSION=1.8.0
wget http://nginx.org/download/nginx-${NGINX_VERSION}.tar.gz
tar -xvzf nginx-${NGINX_VERSION}.tar.gz
cd nginx-${NGINX_VERSION}/
./configure your_previous_nginx_config_goes_here–add-module=$HOME/ngx_pagespeed-release-${NPS_VERSION}-beta
If you are running a 32-bit userland with a 64-bit kernel, you will have build a 32 bit version of pagespeed instead:
setarch i686 ./configure –add-module=$HOME/ngx_pagespeed-release-${NPS_VERSION}-beta
A full example of the ./configure command adding the ngx_pagespeed module would be:
./configure –prefix=/etc/nginx –sbin-path=/usr/sbin/nginx –conf-path=/etc/nginx/nginx.conf –error-log-path=/var/log/nginx/error.log –http-log-path=/var/log/nginx/access.log –pid-path=/var/run/nginx.pid –lock-path=/var/run/nginx.lock –http-client-body-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/client_temp –http-proxy-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/proxy_temp –http-fastcgi-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/fastcgi_temp –http-uwsgi-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/uwsgi_temp –http-scgi-temp-path=/var/cache/nginx/scgi_temp –user=nginx –group=nginx –with-http_ssl_module –with-http_realip_module –with-http_addition_module –with-http_sub_module –with-http_dav_module –with-http_flv_module –with-http_mp4_module –with-http_gunzip_module –with-http_gzip_static_module –with-http_random_index_module –with-http_secure_link_module –with-http_stub_status_module –with-http_auth_request_module –with-mail –with-mail_ssl_module –with-file-aio –with-ipv6 –with-http_spdy_module –with-cc-opt='-O2 -g -pipe -Wp,-D_FORTIFY_SOURCE=2 -fexceptions -fstack-protector –param=ssp-buffer-size=4 -m64 -mtune=generic' –add-module=$HOME/ngx_pagespeed-release-${NPS_VERSION}-beta
Remove Nginx binary packageThis will cause you 1 minute of downtime, or less, depending on how powerful your CPU is. We will now remove Nginx RPM package because it may create conflicts with the source package that we will install later.
yum remove nginx

Install Nginx from source
Just run make and make install from the previous directory where you were
make
make install

Restore init.d files and Nginx configuration files
mv /etc/init.d/nginx.bak /etc/init.d/nginx
cp /etc/nginx.bak/nginx/nginx.conf /etc/nginx/ -fv
cp /etc/nginx.bak/nginx/conf.d/* /etc/nginx/conf.d/* -fv
chkconfig nginx on
service nginx restart
And you are done, now you have a full Nginx package compiled from scratch with ngx_pagespeed support.
How can I use ngx_pagespeed?
First, let’s create the ngx_pagespeed_cache directory, and set the right owner to avoid writing issues when you are using the ngx_pagespeed module:
mkdir /var/ngx_pagespeed_cache
chown nginx.nginx /var/ngx_pagespeed_cache
In order t activate pagespeed, you will have to add a few lines to your nginx.conf file or other include files that you may use. Just add this into every server block where you want PageSpeed enabled:
pagespeed on;
pagespeed FileCachePath /var/ngx_pagespeed_cache;

# Ensure requests for pagespeed optimized resources go to the pagespeed handler
# and no extraneous headers get set.
location ~ ".pagespeed.([a-z].)?[a-z]{2}.[^.]{10}.[^.]+" {
add_header "" "";
}
location ~ "^/pagespeed_static/" { }
location ~ "^/ngx_pagespeed_beacon$" { }
After done, reload Nginx to apply changes:
service nginx reload

Now PageSpeed is active, but the hard part starts now, and that is the configuration of the rules. You will have to read the PageSpeed Configuration Documents and start learning which rule is right for your websites and applications: read more
How can I disable PageSpeed Module?If you ever need to disable ngx_pagespeed then you can disable it easily, edit your nginx.conf file and set:
pagespeed off;

Reload Nginx to apply the changes:
service nginx reload

Conclusion
At this time you should have successfully installed Nginx from source with ngx_pagespeed module fully working. Now it’s up to you to configure it and tune it to get your site speed and performance into the next direction. The only disadvantage from this tutorial is the fact that you will have to update your Nginx installation manually (configuring, making and installing) each time there is a new Nginx version.
The post How to compile ngx_pagespeed into Nginx on CentOS 7 appeared first on ScaleScale.com.