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Razer Product Prototypes At CES 2017 Stolen On Last Day Of Show; CEO Believes It’s Industrial Spying

Razer proudly showcased prototypes of its upcoming products at CES 2017 last week. The Irvine, California-based company even made headlines for its innovative three-screened laptop. Unfortunately, its involvement in the trade show ended on a sour note when it was found out that two of its prototypes were stolen on the last day of the event.

On Monday, Razer CEO Min-Liang Tan took to Facebook to inform fans of the PC game company about the regrettable news he received from the Razer employees at the trade show. He started his post by saying that two of their prototypes were clandestinely taken from their CES booth.

Tan continued by telling his followers that they have since filed the necessary reports for the stealing incident and are working with the CES management and law enforcers to solve this predicament. The CEO also encouraged people following him on Facebook who have information about the incident to reach out to his company at legal@razerzone.com.

At CES 2017, Razer made its presence felt by showcasing a three-screened laptop, which was dubbed Project Valerie. The company also showed off its new Chroma projector under the working title of Project Ariana. It wasn’t disclosed if the stolen prototypes were from the two projects. CNET contacted Razer for information about the stolen devices, but the company did not respond.

Based on Tan’s post, however, Razer is not ruling out the possibility of industrial espionage. “We treat theft/larceny, and if relevant to this case, industrial espionage, very seriously — it is cheating, and cheating doesn’t sit well with us,” he pointed out in his Facebook post. “At Razer, we play hard and we play fair. Our teams worked months on end to conceptualize and develop these units and we pride ourselves in pushing the envelope to deliver the latest and greatest,” Tan quipped.

Engadget reported that this isn’t the first time that some opportunists took advantage of Razer. The company also lost two experimental Blade prototypes from its R&D lab in San Francisco in 2011.

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