Supermicro Ultra SYS-120U-TNR Review: Testing Dual 10nm Ice Lake Xeon in 1U

With the launch of Intel’s Ice Lake Xeon Scalable platform comes a new socket and a range of features that vendors like Supermicro have to design for. The server and enterprise market is so vast that every design can come in a range of configurations and settings, however one of the key elements is managing compute density with memory and accelerator support. The SYS-120U-TNR we are testing today is a dense system with lots of trimmings all within a 1U, to which Supermicro is aiming at virtualization workloads, HPC, Cloud, Software Defined Storage, and 5G. This system can be equipped with upwards of 80 cores, 12 TB of DRAM, and

Supermicro: We Put Two 10nm Ice Lake Xeon LGA4189 Sockets on an ATX Motherboard

Usually, when vendors release dual-socket motherboards, this is typically done on larger form factors such as extended ATX (E-ATX) and even larger ones such as SSB-EEB for server form factors. Supermicro looks to buck the trend and has recently listed a pair of Intel motherboards with dual LGA4189 sockets, designed for Intel’s latest Ice Lake 3rd Gen Xeon Scalable processors. Both the Supermicro X12DPL-NT6 and X12DPL-i6 conform to the ATX form factor and have a very similar design. The key metrics include support for two Intel 3rd generation Ice Lake Xeon processors but also eight memory slots between the two, indicating that each processor runs in only quad-channel mode. This

Supermicro C9Z490-PGW Motherboard Review: Comet Lake with 32 CPU PCIe Lanes

More widely known for its server-grade models, Supermicro always launches a small number of consumer motherboards, sometimes with some extra flair and hardware we don’t see from the regular vendors. This time around, Supermicro’s top-tier C9Z490-PGW uses a PLX chip which enables the board to operate with dual PCIe 3.0 x16 or quadruple PCIe 3.0 x8 slots. This is combined with dual PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 slots from the chipset, a 10 gigabit Ethernet controller, and a Wi-Fi 6 interface which makes the C9Z490-PGW versatile for a wide array of users. Supermicro C9Z490-PGW Overview Supermicro is one of the most recognizable brands in the server and workstation market. Still, as

Supermicro X12SAE W480 Motherboard Review: For Xeon W-1200 Workstations

We have seen numerous Intel Z490 motherboards over the months since Intel’s platform for Comet Lake was announced back in April. While the Z490 is designed for regular consumers and gamers who intend to use the desktop Intel Core i5/i7/i9 processors, Intel also launched its W480 chipset slightly later which is designed for its workstation orientated Xeon W-1200 series. One such board designed specifically for the Xeon W-1200 processors is the Supermicro X12SAE with support for up to 128 GB of DDR4-2933 of ECC and non-ECC UDIMMs. Also included in the feature set are two PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 slots, dual Ethernet including a 2.5 Gigabit controller, as well as

Scaling Inference with NVIDIA’s T4: A Supermicro Solution with 320 PCIe Lanes

When visiting the Supercomputing conference this year, there were plenty of big GPU systems on display for machine learning. A large number were geared towards the heavy duty cards for training, but also a number of inference-only systems cropped up. In heeding the NVIDIA CEO’s mantra of ‘the more you buy, the more you save’, Supermicro showed me one of their scalable inference systems based around the newly released NVIDIA Tesla T4 inference GPU. The big server, based on two Xeon Scalable processors and 24 memory slots, has access to 20 PCIe slots, each running at PCIe 3.0 x16, for a total of 320 PCIe lanes. This is achieved using

Supermicro To Offer Reduced Memory Xeon Scalable

With big chips come big responsibility. One of the key elements of a big chip is its capability and connectivity, and there is always a big expectation that all of those features have to be used in every deployment. Whenever we talk about the LGA2066 consumer products built on mini-ITX reduced size platforms with only one PCIe slot, comments always pour in about why a user should buy a system that doesn’t use all the features. Well, take a look at the server space, where processors used for Compute typically ignore the PCIe side of the equation completely. Now Supermicro has gone one further and applied it to the server

Toshiba’s 14 TB HDDs Now Available from Supermicro

Toshiba was the first maker of hard drives to announce a PMR-based 14 TB HDD last December and apparently it is the first company to start their commercial shipments. As of this week, Supermicro has qualified Toshiba’s MG07-series HDDs with 12 TB and 14 TB capacities for use on select storage server platforms and is now offering the appropriate systems to customers. In addition to servers, the drives will be available from Supermicro’s online store eventually. Toshiba’a MG07 enterprise-grade helium-filled HDDs featuring 14 TB and 12 TB capacities rely on nine and eight PMR platters respectively from Showa Denko, with ~1.56 TB capacity per platter. The drives feature a 7200

Supermicro Jumps Into Cascade Lake: Over 100 New and Updated Offerings

Intel’s new Cascade Lake processors and Optane DC Persistent Memory have been hot topics in the press of late, as we’ve waited patiently for them to be announced. That day was today, and Intel’s partners are in full force announcing their latest platform innovations around these products. Supermicro, one of Intel’s largest OEM partners, put up a number worth taking note of: 100+. That’s the number of new and updated systems the company has ready to fire out of the door to its customers. Supermicro is quite a wild and exciting OEM. The company prides itself on being super agile, and being able to respond to customer-specific system requests in

The Supermicro H11DSi Motherboard Mini-Review: The Sole Dual EPYC Solution

Users looking to build their own dual EPYC workstation or system, using completely off-the-shelf components, do not have a lot of options. Users can buy most of the CPUs at retail or at OEM, as well as memory, a chassis, power supplies, coolers, add-in cards. But the one item where there isn’t a lot of competition for these sorts of builds is in the motherboard. Unless you go down the route of buying a server on rails with a motherboard already fitted, there are very limited dual EPYC motherboard options for users to just purchase. So few in fact, that there are only two, both from Supermicro, and both are